Date Tags diverge

Put simply, copywriting is writing to persuade, convert, and sell. With top-notch content, visitors get more meaning because their issues are resolved and value for money and time is guaranteed. Now, that was always kind of the goal but it was just easier to get around that. When people conduct research, they want up-to-date, accurate information. That’s why it’s important to keep content updated. Recency is becoming an increasingly important ranking factor in Google’s search algorithm and for good reason—your audiences don’t want to waste time reading dated content.

Basic on-page SEO factors to look for

The gibberish score helps with that. While a 301 ensures a Get your arithmetic correct - the primary resources are all available here. Its as easy as KS2 Maths or something like that... user can no longer land on a page — they are redirected to an assigned URL — canonical URLs are accessible. Make sure your visitors know where to find what they need, and of course, make it simple for them to get back where they started. Write “linkbait” articles that will attract the attention of social networks. These articles can be valuable resources, controversial, or humorous.

Start simple, but don't forget gateway sites

For many content marketers, organic traffic earned through SEO is like a holiday bonus: It’s cool if it happens, but no one is planning their monthly budget around it. A simple site map page with links to all of the pages or the most important pages (if you have hundreds or thousands) on your site can be useful. Creating an XML Sitemap file for your site helps ensure that search engines discover the pages on your site. Basically, when a reputable site links to your page, you gain credibility by association. What is Thin Content and Why is it Bad for SEO? By Adam Snape on 20th February 2015 Categories: Content, Google, SEO

In February 2011, Google rolled out an update to its search algorithm called Panda – the first in a series of algorithm updates aimed at penalising low quality websites in search and improving the quality of their search results.

Although Panda was first rolled out several years ago (and followed by Penguin, an update aimed at knocking out black-hat SEO techniques) it’s been updated several times since its initial launch, most recently in September of 2014.

The latest Panda update has much the same purpose as the original – giving better rankings to websites that have useful and relevant content, and penalising sites that have “thin” content that offers little or no value to searchers.

In this guide, we’ll look at what makes content “thin” and why having thin content on your site is a bad thing. We’ll also share some simple tactics that you can use to give your content more value to searchers and avoid having to deal with a penalty.

What is thin content? Thin content can be identified as low quality pages that add little to no value to the reader. Examples of thin content include duplicate pages, automatically generated content or doorway pages.

The best way to measure the quality of your content is through user satisfaction. If visitors quickly bounce from your page, it likely doesn’t provide the value they were looking for.

Google’s initial Panda update was targeted primarily at content farms – sites with a massive amount of content written purely for the purpose of ranking well in search and attracting as much traffic as possible.

You’ve probably clicked your way onto a content farm before – most of us have. The content is typically packed with keywords and light on factual information, giving it big relevancy for a search engine but little value for an actual reader.

The original Panda update also targeted scraper websites – sites that “scraped” text from other websites and reposted it as their own, lifting the work of other people to generate their own search traffic.

As Panda updates keep rolling out, the focus has switched from content farms and scraper sites to websites that offer “thin” content – content that’s full of keywords and copy, but light on any real information.

A great way to think of content is as search engine food. The more unique content your website offers search engines, the more satisfied they are and the higher you will likely rank for the keywords your on-page content mentions.

Offer little food and you’ll provide little for Google to use to understand the focus of your site’s content. As a result, you’ll be outranked for your target search keywords by other websites that offer more detailed, helpful and informative content.

How can Google tell if content is thin? Google’s index includes more than 30 trillion pages, making it impossible to check every page for thin content by hand. While some websites are occasionally subject to a manual review by Google, most content is judged for its value algorithmically.

The ultimate judge of a website’s content is its audience – the readers that visit the site and actually read its content. If the content is good, they’ll probably stay on the website and keep reading; if it’s bad, there’s a good chance they’ll leave.

The length of your content isn’t necessarily an indicator of its “thinness”. As Stephen Kenwright explains at Search Engine Watch, a 2,000 word article on EzineArticles is likely to offer less value to readers than a 500 word blog post by a real expert.

One way Google can algorithmically judge the value of a website’s content is using a metric called “time to long click”. A long click is when a user clicks on a search result and stays on the website for a long time before returning to Google’s search page.

Think about how you browse a website when you discover great quality content. If a blog post or article is particularly engaging, you don’t just read for a minute or two – you click around the website and view other content as well.

A short click, on the other hand, is when a user clicks on a search result and almost immediately returns to Google’s search results page. From here, they might click on another result, indicating to Google that the first result didn’t provide much value.

Should you be worried about thin content? The best measure of your content’s value is user satisfaction. If users stay on your website for a long time after clicking onto it from Google’s search results pages, it probably has high quality, “thick” content that Google likes.

Facts about Google algorithms that will make you think twice

If you conduct business online, you need to use website analytics to track how well your site is doing. Otherwise, you’re essentially running your business blind and will have no insight into your site’s effectiveness. People have different search behaviours and of course languages based on their location so you need to adapt to these factors in order to rank on search engines. Browsers differ in how they treat invalid code so you should always use valid HTML to avoid browser specific issues. According to Gaz Hall, a UK SEO Consultant from SEO York: "The incorrect use of Meta Tags could lead to the web page being banned from any or all search engines- ‘Keyword-stuffing’ is frowned down upon in the SEO community, along with irrelevant data being stored in Meta Tags."

Thinking about onsite SEO makes everything OK

Along with content, backlinks are the primary way that search engines determine a website's popularity. Bing Have you ever dreamed about Heat All for this? has a partnership with Facebook that allows it to access data on user behavior on Facebook and use that to influence rankings and the presentation of its search results. Many local businesses want to improve their results in Google, but aren’t sure where to start. Writing guest posts should be part of every content marketing strategy. Creating content for authority sites can increase your brand awareness, increases your website’s authority and you can get some referral traffic from these websites.